Retractions grow 15-fold, data show

The number of papers found tainted after appearing in peer-reviewed journals soared between 2001 and 2010, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Just 22 retraction notices emerged in 2001, but 139 in 2006 and 339 last year. There have been 210 as of July 2011, data compiled for WSJ by Thomson Reuters show.

Medical journals yanking studies have included The Lancet, while academic institutions like the Mayo Clinic have been caught with their pants down. 

In one case, millions of dollars' worth of private and government funding went to waste and patients put at risk, after 17 papers published in nine journals had to be pulled.




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