Study: 50% hike in rep-hostile docs

Share this article:
Getting face time with busy physicians is becoming harder for pharma reps every year. The fraction of doctors open to meet reps fell nearly 20% last year—to 58% from 71%—while inaccessible doctors now account for 9% of the total, up from 6% last year—a 50% increase.

The findings come from ZS Associates' AccessMonitor report, which monitors rep-related interactions of more than 500,000 physicians, NPs and other prescribers nationwide and tracks both the planned and completed details of about half the nation's sales reps (more than 41,000).

Even docs who were open to seeing some reps became more selective. That trend made some 8 million planned sales calls nearly impossible to complete. Companies are requiring reps to call on prescribers who either refuse to see any sales people at all or refuse to see reps as often as management wants them to, and it's costing pharma more than $1 billion per year.
Share this article:
You must be a registered member of MMM to post a comment.
close

Next Article in Features

Email Newsletters

MM&M Future Leaders


Register now

Early bird $1,950 before 31 October 2014

*Group discounts available on request 

MM&M EBOOK: PATIENT ACCESS

Patient access to pharmaceuticals is a tale of two worlds—affordability has improved for the majority, while the minority is hampered by cost, distribution and red tape. To provide marketers with a well-rounded perspective, MM&M presents this e-book chock full of key insights. Click here to access it.

More in Features

Read the complete October 2014 Digital Edition

Read the complete October 2014 Digital Edition

Click the above link to access the complete Digital Edition of the October 2014 issue of MM&M, with all text, charts and pictures.

Predicting your pink slip

Predicting your pink slip

Any time a firm needs to save money, high-salaried executives are targets

Private View: New ways to engage with customers

Private View: New ways to engage with customers

These healthcare social media campaigns successfully use emotion, altruism and the human desire to "brand" oneself to get customers engaged.