EMD Serono brings back "Birds & Bees" infertility effort

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EMD Serono refreshed its "Birds & Bees" fertility issues awareness campaign with a Facebook page and a music video.

The light-hearted campaign, by agency WCG, features a costumed thirtysomething suburban everycouple -- she a bird, he a bee -- struggling to concieve. Where last year's executions largely played it straight, duds aside, the new work takes a more comical bent. The music video, similar to Toyota's "Swagger Wagon" spot, which was similarly aimed at new and wannabe moms, has Karen and Neil rapping and singing through an R&B number entitled "The Early Bird Gets the Sperm (raps Kate Miccuci-esque Karen: "I do prenatal yoga / And I follow every detox / I heard high heels make you infertile / So I only wear my Reeboks / I drink these nasty smoothies / And I do the acupuncture / My cervical mucus is as thick as peanut butter")."

The idea, said a company spokesperson, is to get around the stigma around fertility issues and "break the ice" with couples who are trying to concieve, encouraging them to talk to a reproductive endocrinologist about their options. The company offers a doctor finder through its patient support website, FertilityLifeLines.com.

EMD Serono's fertility products include Gonal-F, Ovidrel, Luveris and Cetrotide, all hormone treatments. The company estimates that 7.3 million Americans are wrestling with fertility issues.
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